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We work hard to protect our environment and give back to our community with everything we do. Here’s how.

We protect the environment from pollutants.

Most poultry producers use hexane-processed soybeans as a cheap source of chicken feed. But hexane is a volatile solvent that pollutes the air and environment. By using 100% extruded, expeller-pressed soybeans, we keep chemicals out of our feed and protect the environment.

We reduce, reuse and recycle.

Our #1 PETE recyclable packaging is BPA-free, freezer-safe and vacuum-sealed for freshness.

We’ve eliminated the waxed cartons used by other poultry producers. All of our master cases are made from 100% recyclable material. We recycle over 20 tons of corrugated cardboard each month. Learn more about our packaging.

We use water wisely.

We save millions of gallons of water each year with our 100% Air Chilled method, which uses cold air (not chlorinated water) to chill our chickens.

We also recycle our manure, which is used as mushroom compost in other local agricultural industries.

Our onsite wastewater treatment plant lets us use recycled water to wash our live haul trailers, transportation modules and drawers. The wastewater effluent is discharged into a stream that has abundant fish, muskrat, mink, frogs and birds.

We give back

Our success has empowered us to give back to our community in various ways, from sponsoring the Sechler Family Cancer Center in Lebanon, Pennsylvania to volunteering and charitable donations. In 2016, The Association of Fundraising Professionals named our leader, Scott Sechler, Philanthropist of the Year.

With the success of his company, Scott has established a legacy of giving throughout the Lebanon community and beyond. His support of local farmers and FFA organizations by purchasing animals raised by students in the 4-H programs, encourages the continued growth of agriculture in Pennsylvania and giving back to the community that supported him for so long.

Nine years ago, Scott and his team contacted Good Samaritan Hospital to announce plans for a charity golf tournament. They could have never dreamed that the event would grow from a modest $21,000 net contribution in 2009, to $250,000 in August of 2016, for a total of $1 million dollars to date!

When Good Samaritan Hospital shared information with Scott about their dream to enhance cancer care in the Lebanon community, Scott agreed on a major pledge to make the dream a reality. In 2012, Scott formalized his commitment to the cancer center project by pledging $2 million.  In January of 2016, WellSpan Good Samaritan Hospital opened the Sechler Family Cancer Center in Lebanon, Pennsylvania. The new facility would not have been possible without Scott’s leadership and financial support.

Scott’s generosity goes well beyond the cancer project, as he continues to impact many lives in many other communities. In Berks County, he orchestrated and funded the renovation of a vacant school into a Community Campus. The facility is now the home to a Penn State Health/St. Joseph urgent care facility, a Senior Center of Berks County Encore, as well as training facilities for local Fire Company volunteers.

“Thanks for doing the right thing. I wish everybody was like you guys!”– Emilio W. (Facebook)

For the past 14 years, Scott has also been instrumental in supporting Lancaster County’s benefit for the missionaries in Haiti, by supplying chicken and a refrigerated truck for the fundraising event.

In Fredericksburg, where his plants are located, Scott has a strong history of support for many community projects, from ball fields to the annual weekend-long Hinkelfest chicken festival, which celebrated 25 years in September 2016.

Scott Sechler and his family have been stalwart philanthropists creating a positive community vision, using their time and financial resources to help others reach their goals. Scott has encouraged business friends and partners to increase their philanthropic involvement, continuing to move the community forward in matters large and small.

Learn more about the Sechlers.